Resources

We have collated all the resources you need to help you break down gender stereotypes,
promote equality and support children’s individuality. 

If you’re looking for resources to help you with breaking down gender stereotypes, promoting equality and supporting children’s individuality, you’ll find them here! We’ve got lesson plans, factsheets, book lists, posters, and more. Click on the links below to explore.

New Resources! 

These tip sheets are for educators and teachers working across pre-school, kindergarten and primary school, as well as anyone interested, to provide information around the evolving space of inclusive language, particularly around the topics of gender and sexuality. They can be printed and displayed in school offices or staff rooms and were developed in partnership with the Department of Education and Training, Access Health & Community and Link Health and Community.

Download TIP SHEET
Download KEY DEFINITIONs

  • Early childhood services
  • Schools
  • Parents and Carers
  • Tools
  • Creating Gender Equity in the Early Years Guide: A Resource for Local Government: This guide provides a range of tools and resources to support local government and early years sectors across Victoria to have a positive influence on gender.
  • No Limitations – Breaking Down Gender Stereotypes in the Early Years:This guide for early years educators, developed by Women’s Health East, provides practical tools, tips and resources for promoting gender equality in early childhood settings. There are checklists for children’s book selection, a guide for creating a gender equality policy for your service, and ideas for working with families. Parents, families and anyone working with young children may also find this useful.
  • Fostering an Inclusive Environment: Practical Tips for Early Childhood Services: A single page tip sheet from Women’s Health East with ideas for early childhood services on how to foster inclusive practice through language, role modelling, changes to the environment, and personal reflection.
  • Inclusive Language Tip Sheet: These tip sheets are for educators and teachers working across pre-school, kindergarten and primary school, as well as anyone interested, to provide information around the evolving space of inclusive language, particularly around the topics of gender and sexuality. They can be printed and displayed in school offices or staff rooms and were developed in partnership with the Department of Education and Training, Access Health & Community and Link Health and Community.
    Click here for the Key Definitions Tip Sheet.

  • Poster: Gender Stereotypes: The What, How and Why for Families: This poster was developed by Women’s Health East and is great to display around your centre. It provides information about gender stereotypes and includes practical tips for families to try at home. 
  • The Department of Education and Training: are inviting early childhood educators to sign up for free respectful relationships professional development training.
  • Putting Children First: Playing Fair: Great paper from Putting Children First, the magazine of the National Childcare Accreditation Council (NCAC)  about the importance of early childhood educators in breaking down gender stereotypes and promoting gender equity – lots of ideas and suggestions
  • Rainbow Families: Early Years Support Guide: A guide aimed at supporting LGBTIQ+ expecting parents and parents with babies and pre-school aged children to navigate the unique challenges of the early years of being a rainbow family, also aimed at providing insight and understanding to early years educators and teachers
  • Building respect and equity among young people: Produced by City of Melbourne and Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria’s Partnerships in Prevention initiative, these tip sheets are designed to help all professionals working with young children to promote respect and equity. The tip sheets are based on the work conducted by educators and families as part of City of Melbourne’s Building Children’s Resilience through Respectful and Equitable Relationships Pilot Project.
  • Educate2Empower Publishing: Children’s book publisher specialising in children’s books on body safety, consent, gender quality, social and emotional intelligence and respectful relationships – lots of free resources here including posters, activities, e-books and videos.
  • ALL come out to play! Lesson Plans:  These lesson plans have been developed through collaboration with Playgroup Victoria, industry professionals and Victoria University.  They have been developed to extend conversation and learnings about gender equality and respectful relationships following presentation of ALL come out to play!  sessions.
  • Girls Can Boys Can: This project works with parents, carers, educators and children to create messages for books, clothing, posters and toys that show the healthy, fun, equal and respectful relationships between girls and boys, along with the strengths of Aboriginal children, families and communities. The project is funded by the Northern Territory Government and is a partnership between the Tangentyere Family Violence Prevention Program and the Larapinta Child and Family Centre.

International Resources for educators:

  • Just Like a Child – Zero Tolerance (SCT): This guide aims to combat gender stereotyping in the earliest years of life, through working with childcare professionals, parents and anyone concerned about the wellbeing of children.
  • The Global Equality Collective (UK):  The aim of the collective is that together we can close the gender gap in homes, schools and businesses and achieve gender equality. The Global Equality Collective are based in the UK but the collective is made up of subject experts from all over the world (including us..wooo!). By pooling all of our collective knowledge and bringing together all of the brilliant resources that have already been created, we can continue working towards gender equality and a world free from violence.
  • Be Prepared for Questions and Put-Downs about Gender Fact Sheet: This fact sheet was developed by Welcoming Schools. It is important to practice how to respond to questions related to gender and how to interrupt gender based teasing and bullying. Being prepared will help you embrace teachable moments with your students to foster a gender inclusive school.
  • Gender Stereotyping in the Early Years: UK article about gender stereotypes in the early years setting, and developmental impacts. Contains links to further reading, and tips and suggestions for early years professionals.
  • A guide to promoting gender equality – Gender equality support: UK selection of resources, books, programs and action guides for early years educators to evaluate and promote gender equality in their services
  • Our Watch School Gender Equality Assessment: This is a gender equity assessment tool that can be adapted for a school context.
  • Inclusive Language Tip Sheet: These tip sheets are for educators and teachers working across pre-school, kindergarten and primary school, as well as anyone interested, to provide information around the evolving space of inclusive language, particularly around the topics of gender and sexuality. They can be printed and displayed in school offices or staff rooms and were developed in partnership with the Department of Education and Training, Access Health & Community and Link Health and Community.
    Click here for the Key Definitions Tip Sheet.
  • Our Watch Whole School Approach Toolkit – Respectful Relationship Education: This Toolkit has been created by Our Watch to support schools in delivering Respectful Relationships Education, and was developed as part of the Respectful Relationships Education in Schools (RREiS) pilot. 
  • The Association of Women Educators – Gender and Education Guidelines: An e-learning guide with research findings, checklists and links to key readings and resources.
  • Victorian Government Dept of Education and Training Curriculum Resource: F-12 Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships Learning Resources (2016): The learning materials have been designed for teachers in primary and secondary schools to develop students’ social, emotional and positive relationship skills. Efforts to promote social and emotional skills and positive gender norms in children and young people has been shown to improve health related outcomes and subjective wellbeing. It also reduces antisocial behaviours including engagement in gender-related violence.
  • Gender Upfront – Secondary School Teaching Materials: The Association of Women Educators’ 1997 publication includes teaching materials which promotes access and equity, values women and girls and their contributions and critically examines the impact of the social construction of gender in order to promote more equitable outcomes for all students.
  • Schools Work Towards Gender Equity: This is a comprehensive guide to gender reform undertaken in schools across Australia. Frameworks, case studies, data gathering strategies, sample survey questionnaires, references and recommended readings.
  • Schools Gender Equity Framework (1997): Framework prepared by a Taskforce responsible for providing advice to enable improved educational outcomes for girls and boys in Australian schools.
  • Safe Schools Coalition Australia: This is a national coalition of organisations and schools working together to create safe and inclusive school environments for same sex attracted, intersex and gender diverse students, staff and families.
  • “Who is in your family?” A resource kit by Rainbow Families Council: This resource kit aims to help children, families and early childhood educators start discussions about the diversity of families – including same-sex parented families – who are part of their communities. It challenges myths and stereotypes and has suggestions for encouraging family diversity and questioning gender stereotypes.
  • “We’re All Superheroes! – the Equality and Friendship Show”: A fun and interactive show based on the idea of superhero characters. Utilising music, a story, a poem and a superhero chant, they show that girls and boys are equally capable, and that everyone is special and unique in their own way.
  • Building respect and equity among young people: Produced by City of Melbourne and Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria’s Partnerships in Prevention initiative, these tip sheets are designed to help all professionals working with young children to promote respect and equity. The tip sheets are based on the work conducted by educators and families as part of City of Melbourne’s Building Children’s Resilience through Respectful and Equitable Relationships Pilot Project.
  • ABCDEquality: Students act to prevent violence against women:This resource has been developed to support young people to be active bystanders and promote equality and respect among their peers. You can download the poster or individual A-Z cards to share the prevention message with your friends, family, colleagues and networks. 
  • ALL come out to play! Lesson Plans:  These lesson plans have been developed through collaboration with Playgroup Victoria, industry professionals and Victoria University.  They have been developed to extend conversation and learnings about gender equality and respectful relationships following presentation of ALL come out to play!  sessions.
  • Rainbow Families: How Children Play: Challenging myths and stereotypes and has suggestions for encouraging family diversity in play and questioning gender stereotypes.

International Resources

  • Teaching Tolerance (US): Gender is one of 8 topics. An excellent resource with a searchable database of lesson and unit plans on gender related issues.
  • Welcoming Schools (US): Welcoming Schools is a comprehensive approach to creating respectful and supportive elementary schools with resources and professional development to embrace family diversity, create LGBTQ-inclusive schools, prevent bias-based bullying and gender stereotyping, and support transgender and gender-expansive. It has a wide range of resources, lesson plans and activities that you can implement in your school.
  • The Let Toys Be Toys campaign (UK): Many toys and books are marketed as being for one sex or the other and children may worry if their favourite toys or hobbies challenge these stereotypical ideas. Parents and carers are often concerned that children who challenge these norms will be teased or bullied. Let Toys be Toys together with teachers developed resources to help schools tackle these issues in the classroom. 
  • Breaking the Mould (UK): The organisation worked for two years with five primary schools to consider how ‘traditional’ gender stereotypes could be challenged in nursery and primary classrooms. They have published a series of resources which includes lesson plans and activities. 
  • Media Smarts (CAN): Has three lesson plans on breaking down gender stereotypes in the classroom. The target audience is year 8-9. 
  • Geena Davis Institute – Gender in the Media Teachers Resources (US): Have developed extensive educational programs for children focused on gender equality and stereotyping. They aim to inspire and sensitise the next generation of content creators.
  • Miss Representation (USA): Miss Representation is a film that exposes how mainstream media and culture contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.
  • The Mask You Live In (US): Is a film that follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.
  • Raising Rebels (UK): Raising Rebels is a one-stop, all-inclusive hub for anyone who wants to empower children to challenge limiting and damaging gender stereotypes in the UK. They have a range of tools on their website for teachers. 
  • Let Toys Be Toys: Tackling gender stereotyping through language and literacy: Let Toys Be Toys have teamed up with National Literacy Trust to create a free poster for classrooms, featuring top tips for challenging gender stereotyping through literacy, language and play. 
  • #BecauseWhy Campaign- Our Watch:This campaign provides support and practical guidance to parents in challenging gender stereotypes. 
  • Power of Parents Snapshot Report- Our Watch:This report is a summary of a survey and desktop research to understand attitudes towards gender equality and gender stereotypes among parents of 0-3 year old children. It focuses on the power of parents to challenge stereotypes.
  • Poster: Gender Stereotypes: The What, How and Why for Families:This poster was developed by Women’s Health East. It provides information about gender stereotypes and includes practical tips for families to consider gender in the home.
  • No Limitations- Breaking Down Gender Stereotypes in the Early Years:This is a guide for early years educators developed by Women’s Health East. It is also useful for parents and families, and anyone working with young children. The guide is about promoting gender equality in early childhood settings, and provides practical tools, tips and resources for early educators for both an organisational focus and working with families.
  • “Who is in Your Family?” A Resource Kit by Rainbow Families Council:This resource kit aims to help children, families and early childhood educators start discussions about the diversity of families – including same-sex parented families – who are part of their communities. It challenges myths and stereotypes and has suggestions for encouraging family diversity and questioning gender stereotypes. 
  • Just Like a Child- Zero Tolerance (Scotland): This guide aims to combat gender stereotyping in the earliest years of life, through working with childcare professionals, parents and anyone concerned about the wellbeing of children.
  • The Line: Talking to Young Kids about Gender Stereotypes:The Line is a national youth campaign aimed at addressing the attitudes and behaviours that contribute to violence. This campaign is aimed at conversations with a slightly older audience, but is a great resource for initiating discussion on gender, respect and relationships with children of all ages. This section of the website has information on how to speak to your children about gender stereotypes. 
  • Miss Representation: Miss Representation is a film that exposes how mainstream media and culture contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.
  • The Mask You Live In:Is an American film that follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.
  • Let Toys Be Toys Poster: 20 tips on raising children without gender stereotypes:The 20 tips poster from Let Toys Be Toys contains lots of ideas for unstereotyping children.  The poster can be printed and displayed in your home.
  • Tips on Raising Sons to Embrace Healthy, Positive Masculinity:9 tips for parents- a must read! Global experts at Plan International USA (Plan), an international organisation that advances girls’ equality and children’s rights, and Promundo, a global leader in engaging men and boys in promoting gender equality and preventing violence, have drawn from their decades of U.S. and global research and experience to provide concrete tips to help parents talk to their sons about healthy masculinity and self-expression.
  • “The Mums Can, Dads Can” project:This project is part of the Tangentyere Family Violence Prevention Program.  It is being developed and informed by Alice Springs Town Camp women and men to challenge ridged stereotypical beliefs and attitudes about the roles of women and men, especially in respect to parenting. All of the messages that you are seeing have been developed by  Aboriginal Women and Men from Alice Springs. This is a strengths based project aiming to contribute to changing those rigid gender stereotypes that create inequality between women and men.
  • Play Unlimited (AUS): Play Unlimited is an organisation working to eliminate the gendered marketing of children’s toys and to promote the idea that children should be encouraged to learn through the widest possible range of play experiences. The website includes some great articles about gendered marketing and its impacts, and how this can be addressed. A list of retailers ‘doing it right’ is also supplied.
  • Let Toys Be Toys (UK): A  campaign and website which advocates for toy and publishing industries to stop limiting children’s interests by promoting some toys and books as only suitable for girls, and others only for boys. The website promotes resources for educators and parents about gender stereotypes, and gives a list of recommended retailers and books that challenge stereotypes.
  • A Mighty Girl Online Toy Store: A Mighty Girl is the world’s largest collection of books, toys, movies, and music for parents, educators and others dedicated to raising smart, confident, and courageous girls.The toy section features over 2,500 high-quality, girl empowering toys. 
  • Not Only Pink and Blue: An online marketplace for kids toys, clothes and books. We love their description of what they’re about: “We don’t believe in limiting kids before they’ve had chance to discover what they love, so on our site, you don’t search by gender but by activity and attitude to find gender neutral and gender inclusive products.” Yes!
  • Rainbow Families: How Children Play: Challenging myths and stereotypes and has suggestions for encouraging family diversity in play and questioning gender stereotypes.
  • Our Watch School Gender Equality Assessment: The template is designed as a guide for discussion and reflection among the team leading Respectful Relationships Education in your school. The presence of senior school leadership on this team will ensure that this assessment has the most impact possible.
  • Maribyrnong City Council Gender Audit Tool: A tool to assist in a gender audit of facilities which can be adapted for use with an early childhood service or school.
  • Samples of Gender Equity Policies: Organisations can adapt and tailor policy examples to your individual service, or can strengthen current and existing policy by adding a few additional sentences (Page 24 & 25).
  • Respect – Australian Government: This national campaign aims to help break the cycle of violence by encouraging adults to reflect on their attitudes and the things they say to boys and girls, and have conversations about respect with young people.
  • The Line: The Line is a national youth campaign aimed at addressing the attitudes and behaviours that contribute to violence. This campaign is aimed at conversations with a slightly older audience, but is a great resource for initiating discussion on gender, respect and relationships with children of all ages.
  • The Bechdel Test: The test is a measure of the representation of women in fiction. It asks whether a film features at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man. The test is used as an indicator for the active presence of women in the entire field of film and other fiction, and to call attention to gender inequality in fiction.
  • Maisy Test: This test was developed by Sacraparental and was inspired by the Bechdel Test. It is a version that is more appropriate for kids’ viewing. The test has four questions to ask of all kids’ media to expose the sexist shows and praise progressive shows. 
  • The Representation Test: The test is a tool for examining the various ways in which films marginalise and underrepresented people. From the lack of women given starring roles to the general invisibility of people with disabilities, the test gives us a way to start a conversation about diversity at the movie theatre – and with the film studios themselves.
  • #LikeaGirl Campaign: This is a YouTube clip of the campaign. Using #LikeAGirl as an insult is a hard knock against any girl. And since the rest of puberty really no picnic either, it’s easy to see what a huge impact it can have on a girl’s self-confidence. This campaign encourages girls that #LikeAGirl is an awesome thing!
  • #RedrawTheBalance Campaign: This powerful YouTube clip provocatively captures how, early on in their education, children already define career opportunities as male and female. When asked to draw a firefighter, surgeon and a fighter pilot, 61 pictures were drawn of men and only 5 were female. It’s time to #redrawthebalance.
  • List of videos: Videos are a great way to start conversations with work colleagues and families. Below is a list of videos which cover a variety of topics and provide some important conversation starters. You could use these during a staff meeting or at a parent information night.

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Welcome to our website. We hope that you will find lots of great ideas for playing, reading and learning with children here. We are passionate about raising children who can be their true selves, who are free to explore all the things that interest them in life.

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