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This section of the website provides access to the latest resources in all areas of Learn and Gender Equality. There are many resources for early childhood educators, but parents may also find lots of ideas for activities to do with children.

The main aim is to help build a safe and supportive learning environment that caters for all children’s interests and passions, where every child can be a dancer, train driver, baker, shop assistant and more.

Some examples of what you will find in this section includes YouTube clips, activities that promote gender equality, audits for your environment, lesson plans, teaching guides and more.

Soon you will also have access to online professional development to build knowledge in the importance of breaking down gender norms and stereotypes for both child development as well as family violence.

Make sure you sign up to our database which will ensure that you will be kept up to date with the latest resources.



Below is a list of tools and resources that you can view online and use.  If you have any ideas for further resources that you would like added to the list, please contact us and let us know.

Australian resources for educators:

International Resources for educators:

  • Just Like a Child – Zero Tolerance (SCT): This guide aims to combat gender stereotyping in the earliest years of life, through working with childcare professionals, parents and anyone concerned about the wellbeing of children.
  • Raising Rebels (UK): Raising Rebels is a one-stop, all-inclusive hub for anyone who wants to empower children to challenge limiting and damaging gender stereotypes in the UK. They have a range of tools on their website for teachers. 

Australian Resources

 

International Resources

  • Teaching Tolerance (US): Gender is one of 8 topics. An excellent resource with a searchable database of lesson and unit plans on gender related issues.
  • Welcoming Schools (US): Welcoming Schools is a comprehensive approach to creating respectful and supportive elementary schools with resources and professional development to embrace family diversity, create LGBTQ-inclusive schools, prevent bias-based bullying and gender stereotyping, and support transgender and gender-expansive. It has a wide range of resources, lesson plans and activities that you can implement in your school.
  • The Let Toys Be Toys campaign (UK): Many toys and books are marketed as being for one sex or the other and children may worry if their favourite toys or hobbies challenge these stereotypical ideas. Parents and carers are often concerned that children who challenge these norms will be teased or bullied. Let Toys be Toys together with teachers developed resources to help schools tackle these issues in the classroom. 
  • Breaking the Mould (UK): The organisation worked for two years with five primary schools to consider how ‘traditional’ gender stereotypes could be challenged in nursery and primary classrooms. They have published a series of resources which includes lesson plans and activities. 
  • Media Smarts (CAN): Has three lesson plans on breaking down gender stereotypes in the classroom. The target audience is year 8-9. 
  • Geena Davis Institute – Gender in the Media Teachers Resources (US): Have developed extensive educational programs for children focused on gender equality and stereotyping. They aim to inspire and sensitise the next generation of content creators.
  • Miss Representation (USA): Miss Representation is a film that exposes how mainstream media and culture contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.
  • The Mask You Live In (US): Is a film that follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.
  • Raising Rebels (UK): Raising Rebels is a one-stop, all-inclusive hub for anyone who wants to empower children to challenge limiting and damaging gender stereotypes in the UK. They have a range of tools on their website for teachers. 
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  • #BecauseWhy Campaign- Our Watch: This campaign provides support and practical guidance to parents in challenging gender stereotypes. 
  • Power of Parents Snapshot Report- Our Watch: This report is a summary of a survey and desktop research to understand attitudes towards gender equality and gender stereotypes among parents of 0-3 year old children. It focuses on the power of parents to challenge stereotypes.
  • Poster: Gender Stereotypes: The What, How and Why for Families: This poster was developed by Women’s Health East. It provides information about gender stereotypes and includes practical tips for families to consider gender in the home.
  • No Limitations- Breaking Down Gender Stereotypes in the Early Years: This is a guide for early years educators developed by Women’s Health East. It is also useful for parents and families, and anyone working with young children. The guide is about promoting gender equality in early childhood settings, and provides practical tools, tips and resources for early educators for both an organisational focus and working with families.
  • “Who is in Your Family?” A Resource Kit by Rainbow Families Council: This resource kit aims to help children, families and early childhood educators start discussions about the diversity of families – including same-sex parented families – who are part of their communities. It challenges myths and stereotypes and has suggestions for encouraging family diversity and questioning gender stereotypes. 
  • Just Like a Child- Zero Tolerance (Scotland): This guide aims to combat gender stereotyping in the earliest years of life, through working with childcare professionals, parents and anyone concerned about the wellbeing of children.
  • Miss Representation: Miss Representation is a film that exposes how mainstream media and culture contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.
  • The Mask You Live In: Is an American film that follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.
  • Let Toys Be Toys Poster: 20 tips on raising children without gender stereotypes: The 20 tips poster from Let Toys Be Toys contains lots of ideas for unstereotyping children.  The poster can be printed and displayed in your home.
  • Tips on Raising Sons to Embrace Healthy, Positive Masculinity: Global experts at Plan International USA (Plan), an international organisation that advances girls’ equality and children’s rights, and Promundo, a global leader in engaging men and boys in promoting gender equality and preventing violence, have drawn from their decades of U.S. and global research and experience to provide concrete tips to help parents talk to their sons about healthy masculinity and self-expression.
  • Our Watch School Gender Equality Assessment: The template is designed as a guide for discussion and reflection among the team leading Respectful Relationships Education in your school. The presence of senior school leadership on this team will ensure that this assessment has the most impact possible.
  • Maribyrnong City Council Gender Audit Tool: A tool to assist in a gender audit of facilities which can be adapted for use with an early childhood service or school.
  • Samples of Gender Equity Policies: Organisations can adapt and tailor policy examples to your individual service, or can strengthen current and existing policy by adding a few additional sentences (Page 24 & 25).
  • Respect – Australian Government: This national campaign aims to help break the cycle of violence by encouraging adults to reflect on their attitudes and the things they say to boys and girls, and have conversations about respect with young people.
  • The Line: The Line is a national youth campaign aimed at addressing the attitudes and behaviours that contribute to violence. This campaign is aimed at conversations with a slightly older audience, but is a great resource for initiating discussion on gender, respect and relationships with children of all ages.
  • #LikeaGirl Campaign: This is a YouTube clip of the campaign. Using #LikeAGirl as an insult is a hard knock against any girl. And since the rest of puberty’s really no picnic either, it’s easy to see what a huge impact it can have on a girl’s self-confidence. This campaign encourages girls that #LikeAGirl is an awesome thing!
  • Huggies Nappies Advertisement: This YouTube advertisements shows how easy it is for brands to stay within the gender stereotypes and how it has become the ‘norm’. 
  • #RedrawTheBalance Campaign: This powerful YouTube clip provocatively captures how, early on in their education, children already define career opportunities as male and female. When asked to draw a firefighter, surgeon and a fighter pilot, 61 pictures were drawn of men and only 5 were female. It’s time to #redrawthebalance.
  • Pantene Campaign: This is a YouTube clip of the Pantene campaign that showcases the different labels that men and women receive when carrying out the same actions. 
  • Riley’s Rant on Marketing for Toys: This is a YouTube clip of a girl in a toy shop that gets angry about what is on offer for girls. 
  • Big Dreams Colouring Book: Big Dreams is a 7-page colouring book packed full of illustrations that encourage children to be free to follow their dreams.The colouring book was created as part of an art project undertaken by EDVOS with students at Ringwood Secondary College. The students participated in a discussion about gender inequality and the specific issues it creates for both boys and girls when exposed to rigid gender stereotypes. 
  • The Bechdel Test: The test is a measure of the representation of women in fiction. It asks whether a film features at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man. The test is used as an indicator for the active presence of women in the entire field of film and other fiction, and to call attention to gender inequality in fiction.
  • Maisy Test: This test was developed by Sacraparental and was inspired by the Bechdel Test. It is a version that is more appropriate for kids’ viewing. The test has four questions to ask of all kids’ media to expose the sexist shows and praise progressive shows. 
  • The Representation Test: The test is a tool for examining the various ways in which films marginalise and underrepresent people. From the lack of women given starring roles to the general invisibility of people with disabilities, the test gives us a way to start a conversation about diversity at the movie theatre – and with the film studios themselves.

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Welcome to our website. We hope that you will find lots of great ideas for playing, reading and learning with children here. We are passionate about raising children who can be their true selves, who are free to explore all the things that interest them in life.

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